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Aerobic exercise promotes executive functions and impacts functional neural activity among older adults with vascular cognitive impairment

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Sports Medicine, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
25 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
89 tweeters
facebook
8 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
33 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
256 Mendeley
Title
Aerobic exercise promotes executive functions and impacts functional neural activity among older adults with vascular cognitive impairment
Published in
British Journal of Sports Medicine, April 2017
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2016-096846
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chun Liang Hsu, John R Best, Jennifer C Davis, Lindsay S Nagamatsu, Shirley Wang, Lara A Boyd, GY Robin Hsiung, Michelle W Voss, Janice Jennifer Eng, Teresa Liu-Ambrose

Abstract

Vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) results from cerebrovascular disease, and worldwide, it is the second most common type of cognitive dysfunction. While targeted aerobic training is a promising approach to delay the progression of VCI by reducing cardiometabolic risk factors, few randomised controlled trials to date have specifically assessed the efficacy of aerobic training on cognitive and brain outcomes in this group at risk for functional decline. To examine the effect of moderate-intensity aerobic training on executive functions and functional neural activity among older adults with mild subcortical ischaemic VCI (SIVCI). Older adults with mild SIVCI were randomly assigned to: (1) 6-month, 3×/week aerobic training (n=10) or (2) usual care (control; n=11). Participants completed functional MRI (fMRI) at baseline and trial completion. During the fMRI sessions, behavioural performance on the Eriksen flanker task and task-evoked neural activity were assessed. At trial completion, after adjusting for baseline general cognition, total white matter lesion volume and flanker performance, compared with the control group, the aerobic training group significantly improved flanker task reaction time. Moreover, compared with the controls, the aerobic training group demonstrated reduced activation in the left lateral occipital cortex and right superior temporal gyrus. Reduced activity in these brain regions was significantly associated with improved (ie, faster) flanker task performance at trial completion. Aerobic training among older adults with mild SIVCI can improve executive functions and neural efficiency of associated brain areas. Future studies with greater sample size should be completed to replicate and extend these findings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 89 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 256 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 255 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 71 28%
Student > Master 27 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 9%
Researcher 21 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 6%
Other 34 13%
Unknown 66 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 51 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 47 18%
Psychology 23 9%
Neuroscience 22 9%
Sports and Recreations 19 7%
Other 19 7%
Unknown 75 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 281. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 October 2019.
All research outputs
#52,863
of 15,115,606 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Sports Medicine
#194
of 5,325 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,154
of 265,945 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Sports Medicine
#14
of 139 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,115,606 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,325 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 49.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,945 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 139 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.