↓ Skip to main content

Birth cohort trends in the global epidemiology of alcohol use and alcohol-related harms in men and women: systematic review and metaregression

Overview of attention for article published in BMJ Open, October 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#1 of 5,414)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
189 news outlets
blogs
9 blogs
twitter
149 tweeters
facebook
9 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Readers on

mendeley
19 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Birth cohort trends in the global epidemiology of alcohol use and alcohol-related harms in men and women: systematic review and metaregression
Published in
BMJ Open, October 2016
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-011827
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tim Slade, Cath Chapman, Wendy Swift, Katherine Keyes, Zoe Tonks, Maree Teesson, Slade, Tim, Chapman, Cath, Swift, Wendy, Keyes, Katherine, Tonks, Zoe, Teesson, Maree

Abstract

Historically, alcohol use and related harms are more prevalent in men than in women. However, emerging evidence suggests the epidemiology of alcohol use is changing in younger cohorts. The current study aimed to systematically summarise published literature on birth cohort changes in male-to-female ratios in indicators of alcohol use and related harms. We identified 68 studies that met inclusion criteria. We calculated male-to-female ratios for 3 broad categories of alcohol use and harms (any alcohol use, problematic alcohol use and alcohol-related harms) stratified by 5-year birth cohorts ranging from 1891 to 2001, generating 1568 sex ratios. Random-effects meta-analyses produced pooled sex ratios within these 3 categories separately for each birth cohort. There was a linear decrease over time in the sex ratio for all 3 categories of alcohol use and related harms. Among those born in the early 1900s, males were 2.2 (95% CI 1.9 to 2.5) times more likely than females to consume alcohol, 3.0 (95% CI 1.5 to 6.0) times more likely to drink alcohol in ways suggestive of problematic use and 3.6 (95% CI 0.4 to 30.3) times more likely to experience alcohol-related harms. Among cohorts born in the late 1900s, males were 1.1 (95% CI 1.1 to 1.2) times more likely than females to consume alcohol, 1.2 (95% CI 1.1 to 1.4) times more likely to drink alcohol in ways suggestive of problematic use and 1.3 (95% CI 1.2 to 1.3) times more likely to experience alcohol-related harms. Findings confirm the closing male-female gap in indicators of alcohol use and related harms. The closing male-female gap is most evident among young adults, highlighting the importance of prospectively tracking young male and female cohorts as they age into their 30s, 40s and beyond.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 149 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 5%
Unknown 18 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 4 21%
Student > Postgraduate 3 16%
Researcher 3 16%
Unspecified 3 16%
Student > Bachelor 2 11%
Other 3 16%
Unknown 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 37%
Unspecified 3 16%
Psychology 3 16%
Social Sciences 3 16%
Arts and Humanities 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1688. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 March 2017.
All research outputs
#407
of 7,711,682 outputs
Outputs from BMJ Open
#1
of 5,414 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#32
of 238,035 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMJ Open
#1
of 388 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,711,682 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,414 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 238,035 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 388 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.