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‘You can't be a person and a doctor’: the work–life balance of doctors in training—a qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in BMJ Open, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
174 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Readers on

mendeley
13 Mendeley
Title
‘You can't be a person and a doctor’: the work–life balance of doctors in training—a qualitative study
Published in
BMJ Open, December 2016
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-013897
Pubmed ID
Authors

Antonia Rich, Rowena Viney, Sarah Needleman, Ann Griffin, Katherine Woolf, Rich, Antonia, Viney, Rowena, Needleman, Sarah, Griffin, Ann, Woolf, Katherine

Abstract

Investigate the work-life balance of doctors in training in the UK from the perspectives of trainers and trainees. Qualitative semistructured focus groups and interviews with trainees and trainers. Postgraduate medical training in London, Yorkshire and Humber, Kent, Surrey and Sussex, and Wales during the junior doctor contract dispute at the end of 2015. Part of a larger General Medical Council study about the fairness of postgraduate medical training. 96 trainees and 41 trainers. Trainees comprised UK graduates and International Medical Graduates, across all stages of training in 6 specialties (General Practice, Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Psychiatry, Radiology, Surgery) and Foundation. Postgraduate training was characterised by work-life imbalance. Long hours at work were typically supplemented with revision and completion of the e-portfolio. Trainees regularly moved workplaces which could disrupt their personal lives and sometimes led to separation from friends and family. This made it challenging to cope with personal pressures, the stresses of which could then impinge on learning and training, while also leaving trainees with a lack of social support outside work to buffer against the considerable stresses of training. Low morale and harm to well-being resulted in some trainees feeling dehumanised. Work-life imbalance was particularly severe for those with children and especially women who faced a lack of less-than-full-time positions and discriminatory attitudes. Female trainees frequently talked about having to choose a specialty they felt was more conducive to a work-life balance such as General Practice. The proposed junior doctor contract was felt to exacerbate existing problems. A lack of work-life balance in postgraduate medical training negatively impacted on trainees' learning and well-being. Women with children were particularly affected, suggesting this group would benefit the greatest from changes to improve the work-life balance of trainees.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 174 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 2 15%
Student > Master 2 15%
Other 2 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 15%
Professor 1 8%
Other 4 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 54%
Psychology 2 15%
Arts and Humanities 1 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 8%
Other 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 139. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 February 2017.
All research outputs
#47,547
of 7,705,958 outputs
Outputs from BMJ Open
#113
of 5,408 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,896
of 246,206 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMJ Open
#14
of 408 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,705,958 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,408 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 246,206 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 408 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.