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Content analysis of UK newspaper and online news representations of women's and men's ‘binge’ drinking: a challenge for communicating evidence-based messages about single-episodic drinking?

Overview of attention for article published in BMJ Open, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
10 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
61 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
180 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Content analysis of UK newspaper and online news representations of women's and men's ‘binge’ drinking: a challenge for communicating evidence-based messages about single-episodic drinking?
Published in
BMJ Open, December 2016
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-013124
Pubmed ID
Authors

C Patterson, C Emslie, O Mason, G Fergie, S Hilton

Abstract

In the UK, men's alcohol-related morbidity and mortality still greatly exceeds women's, despite an increase in women's alcohol consumption in recent decades. New UK alcohol guidelines introduce gender-neutral low-risk alcohol consumption guidance. This study explores how UK newspaper and online news represent women's and men's 'binge' drinking to identify opportunities to better align reporting of harmful drinking with evidence. Quantitative and qualitative content analysis of 308 articles published in 7 UK national newspapers and the BBC News website between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2013. Articles associated women with 'binge' drinking more frequently than men, and presented women's drinking as more problematic. Men were more frequently characterised as violent or disorderly, while women were characterised as out of control, putting themselves in danger, harming their physical appearance and burdening men. Descriptions of female 'binge' drinkers' clothing and appearance were typically moralistic. The UK news media's disproportionate focus on women's 'binge' drinking is at odds with epidemiological evidence, may reproduce harmful gender stereotypes and may obstruct public understandings of the gender-neutral weekly consumption limits in newly proposed alcohol guidelines. In order to better align reporting of harmful drinking with current evidence, public health advocates may engage with the media with a view to shifting media framing of 'binge' drinking away from specific groups (young people; women) and contexts (public drinking) and towards the health risks of specific drinking behaviours, which affect all groups regardless of context.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 61 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 180 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 179 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 37 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 17%
Student > Bachelor 19 11%
Researcher 12 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 4%
Other 32 18%
Unknown 42 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 44 24%
Psychology 23 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 19 11%
Arts and Humanities 9 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 4%
Other 31 17%
Unknown 46 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 129. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 March 2018.
All research outputs
#244,559
of 21,647,344 outputs
Outputs from BMJ Open
#433
of 21,002 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,742
of 420,846 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMJ Open
#15
of 420 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,647,344 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 21,002 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 420,846 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 420 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.