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Concussion in the international ice hockey World Championships and Olympic Winter Games between 2006 and 2015

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Sports Medicine, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (59th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
16 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
39 Mendeley
Title
Concussion in the international ice hockey World Championships and Olympic Winter Games between 2006 and 2015
Published in
British Journal of Sports Medicine, February 2017
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2016-097119
Pubmed ID
Authors

Markku Tuominen, Timo Hänninen, Jari Parkkari, Michael J Stuart, Teemu Luoto, Pekka Kannus, Mark Aubry

Abstract

Concussions in sports are a growing concern. This study describes the incidence, injury characteristics and time trends of concussions in international ice hockey. All concussions in the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) World Championships (WC) and Olympic Winter Games were analysed over 9 ice hockey seasons between 2006 and 2015 using a standardised injury reporting system and diagnoses made by the team physicians. A total of 3293 games were played (169 tournaments, 1212 teams, 26 130 players) comprising 142 244 athletic game exposures. The average injury rate (IR) for concussion was 1.1 per 1000 ice hockey player-games for all IIHF WC tournaments. The IR was the highest in the men's WC A-pool tournaments and Olympic Games (IR 1.6). However, the annual IR for concussion in the men's tournaments has been lower than that in the World Junior tournaments since 2012. When a concussion occurred with contact to a flexible board, the IR was 0.2 per 1000 player games. In contrast, the IR was 1.1, if the board and glass were traditional (for the latter, RR 6.44 (95% CI 1.50 to 27.61)). In the men's tournaments, the trend of concussions caused by illegal hits decreased over the study period. After the 4th Consensus Statement on Concussion in Sport was published (2013), none of the concussed players in the men's WC returned to play on the day of injury. The annual risk of concussion in the men's WC has decreased during the study period. This was most likely due to a reduction in illegal hits. The risk of concussion was significantly lower if games were played on rinks with flexible boards and glass. Rink modifications, improved education and strict rule enforcement should be considered by policymakers in international ice hockey.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 38 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 18%
Unspecified 6 15%
Student > Bachelor 6 15%
Researcher 4 10%
Other 6 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 11 28%
Unspecified 9 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 10%
Psychology 3 8%
Other 5 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 June 2019.
All research outputs
#1,135,607
of 13,487,123 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Sports Medicine
#2,106
of 5,062 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#41,715
of 346,786 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Sports Medicine
#73
of 182 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,487,123 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,062 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 47.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 346,786 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 182 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.