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How much sugar is hidden in drinks marketed to children? A survey of fruit juices, juice drinks and smoothies

Overview of attention for article published in BMJ Open, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#13 of 5,988)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
53 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
309 tweeters
facebook
16 Facebook pages
googleplus
5 Google+ users
video
1 video uploader

Readers on

mendeley
39 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
How much sugar is hidden in drinks marketed to children? A survey of fruit juices, juice drinks and smoothies
Published in
BMJ Open, March 2016
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010330
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jane Boulton, Kawther M Hashem, Katharine H Jenner, Ffion Lloyd-Williams, Helen Bromley, Simon Capewell, Boulton, Jane, Hashem, Kawther M, Jenner, Katharine H, Lloyd-Williams, Ffion, Bromley, Helen, Capewell, Simon

Abstract

To investigate the amount of sugars in fruit juices, juice drinks and smoothies (FJJDS) marketed to children. We surveyed the sugars content (per 100 ml and standardised 200 ml portion) of all FJJDS sold by seven major UK supermarkets (supermarket own and branded products). Only products specifically marketed towards children were included. We excluded sports drinks, iced teas, sugar-sweetened carbonated drinks and cordials as being not specifically marketed towards children. We identified 203 fruit juices (n=21), juice drinks (n=158) and smoothies (n=24) marketed to children. Sugars content ranged from 0 to 16 g/100 ml. The mean sugars content was 7.0 g/100 ml, but among the 100% fruit juice category, it was 10.7 g/100 ml. Smoothies (13.0 g/100 ml) contained the highest amounts of sugars and juice drinks (5.6 g/100 ml) contained the lowest amount. 117 of the 203 FJJDS surveyed would receive a Food Standards Agency 'red' colour-coded label for sugars per standardised 200 ml serving. Only 63 FJJDS would receive a 'green' colour-coded label. 85 products contained at least 19 g of sugars-a child's entire maximum daily amount of sugars. 57 products contained sugar (sucrose), 65 contained non-caloric sweeteners and five contained both. Seven products contained glucose-fructose syrup. The sugars content in FJJDS marketed to children in the UK is unacceptably high. Manufacturers must stop adding unnecessary sugars and calories to their FJJDS.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 309 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 3%
Unknown 38 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 31%
Student > Bachelor 10 26%
Other 5 13%
Researcher 4 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 8%
Other 5 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 44%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 10%
Social Sciences 3 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Other 8 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 675. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 August 2017.
All research outputs
#4,165
of 8,204,513 outputs
Outputs from BMJ Open
#13
of 5,988 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#385
of 280,960 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMJ Open
#1
of 360 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,204,513 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,988 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,960 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 360 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.