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A systematic review, meta-analysis and meta-regression of the effect of protein supplementation on resistance training-induced gains in muscle mass and strength in healthy adults

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Sports Medicine, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#11 of 4,987)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Citations

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Readers on

mendeley
671 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
Title
A systematic review, meta-analysis and meta-regression of the effect of protein supplementation on resistance training-induced gains in muscle mass and strength in healthy adults
Published in
British Journal of Sports Medicine, July 2017
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2017-097608
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert W Morton, Kevin T Murphy, Sean R McKellar, Brad J Schoenfeld, Menno Henselmans, Eric Helms, Alan A Aragon, Michaela C Devries, Laura Banfield, James W Krieger, Stuart M Phillips

Abstract

We performed a systematic review, meta-analysis and meta-regression to determine if dietary protein supplementation augments resistance exercise training (RET)-induced gains in muscle mass and strength. A systematic search of Medline, Embase, CINAHL and SportDiscus. Only randomised controlled trials with RET ≥6 weeks in duration and dietary protein supplementation. Random-effects meta-analyses and meta-regressions with four a priori determined covariates. Two-phase break point analysis was used to determine the relationship between total protein intake and changes in fat-free mass (FFM). Data from 49 studies with 1863 participants showed that dietary protein supplementation significantly (all p<0.05) increased changes (means (95% CI)) in: strength-one-repetition-maximum (2.49 kg (0.64, 4.33)), FFM (0.30 kg (0.09, 0.52)) and muscle size-muscle fibre cross-sectional area (CSA; 310 µm(2) (51, 570)) and mid-femur CSA (7.2 mm(2) (0.20, 14.30)) during periods of prolonged RET. The impact of protein supplementation on gains in FFM was reduced with increasing age (-0.01 kg (-0.02,-0.00), p=0.002) and was more effective in resistance-trained individuals (0.75 kg (0.09, 1.40), p=0.03). Protein supplementation beyond total protein intakes of 1.62 g/kg/day resulted in no further RET-induced gains in FFM. Dietary protein supplementation significantly enhanced changes in muscle strength and size during prolonged RET in healthy adults. Increasing age reduces and training experience increases the efficacy of protein supplementation during RET. With protein supplementation, protein intakes at amounts greater than ~1.6 g/kg/day do not further contribute RET-induced gains in FFM.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 1,608 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 671 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 671 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 151 23%
Student > Bachelor 127 19%
Unspecified 78 12%
Researcher 72 11%
Other 56 8%
Other 187 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 201 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 116 17%
Unspecified 112 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 100 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 52 8%
Other 90 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1365. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 June 2019.
All research outputs
#1,837
of 13,122,960 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Sports Medicine
#11
of 4,987 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#108
of 262,225 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Sports Medicine
#3
of 138 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,122,960 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,987 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 46.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,225 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 138 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.